Tonya Cooley

Tonya Cooley is a pediatric Occupational Therapist with over 20 years of experience. She loves creating things and solving problems.

Current Monthly Specials

April is OT Month, and I have been working on some very exciting projects, but they won’t be completed by the end of the month so… Let’s have a sale. For OT Month, you can 20% off all orders with the code otmonth. Just enter the coupon code (otmonth) at checkout to get the 20% off at both the community shop, and at Therapy Fun Store. Go check out what is on sale now.  The community is where I will {Read More}

Fine Motor Pet Feeding

Animals are great fun for kids and can make it motivating to work on skills. I don’t have any real animals to work with, so I made some pet store animals for the kids to feed, use clothespins, and practice some writing. The activity is simple and cute. First you roll the dice to determine which animal you will be feeding (each animal is assigned a number on the board). Then it is time to feed your animal. You can {Read More}

Make Button Flowers

Flowers make a great spring time activity, and there are so many ways to incorporate flowers into therapy to work on fine motor, visual motor, and coordination. I have many flower activities, such as ones that use clothes pins, but today we are using buttons in our flower activity. It is so simple to make your own button flower, and all you need is some felt, pipe cleaner, and buttons. I will show you how to make the simple version, {Read More}

UnBuckle Me

At Therapy Fun Zone, we focus a lot on activities for children that develop their skills. However, I was recently contacted by an Occupational Therapist, who has invented a new product to help adults who struggle to unbuckle their child’s car seats. I expect many of you will know someone in your family who can relate. No surprise, since I learned that it requires at least 9 lbs. of force to unbuckle, using only the thumb. This new product is {Read More}

Slowing Down With Scissor Cutting

I recently was doing an evaluation, and the student was just snipping at the paper as fast and furiously as she could.  When I tried to help her position the paper or the scissors better, she just pushed me away and kept snipping.  She gave no attempt to follow the lines that she was supposed to be cutting.  I decided to try to slow her down by making it harder for her to snip. I took what was left of {Read More}