Can we practice handwriting without a pencil, please?

Let me start by saying that I’m probably one of the few pediatric occupational therapists who needs help with arts and crafts!  No, seriously!  I am so thankful for the many wonderful websites and blogs whose authors share some of the most incredible activity ideas with me!  And, Pinterest?  Well, I’m not really sure what I did before I joined that nifty “sharing and storage” site!  But, with that said, I can honestly say that I could not function as {Read More}

Sensory Bird Feeders

A fun way to incorporate different sensory experiences, including food experiences, is to make pine cone bird feeders. I have three different types to make that each utilize a slightly different sensory experience. To start with, you attach a pipe cleaner to the top of the pine cone in order to hang the pine cone when done. The first one is made by spreading peanut butter (or sun butter) all over a pine cone. Then you roll the pine cone {Read More}

Keeping Active in the Summer: Tennis

It is Summer and the kids are out of school.  During school, the kids have recess and P.E. most days so they stay relatively active and work on many skills during school.  In the Summer, if left to their own devices, many kids will choose to watch TV or play video and computer games a bit more than is good for them.  They will then miss out on those skill building activities. Some of the best ways to build skills {Read More}

New Vinyl Munchy Ball for Fine Motor

I am excited that the vinyl Munchy Balls are in the shop and they have great resistance to work on fine motor skills and hand strengthening.  The great thing about them being vinyl balls is that they are washable, which is important when working in a clinic setting. When I got the first Munchy Balls that are made out of tennis balls, the question was put out there whether they were latex free.  The tennis balls are made of rubber, {Read More}

Guess Who Clothespin Game

This is a guest post by Donna Abramson, OTR Opening and closing clothespins is a wonderful way for children to develop strength in the muscles of their hand, particularly the webspace – which helps them to hold the pencil with a correct tripod grip. Using clothespins also helps children to separate the radial and ulnar sides of the hands, a prerequisite for efficient fine motor function. Guess Who (by Milton Bradley) is a fun game that I really enjoy playing {Read More}