Using Gel Clings in Therapy

We have a guest post written by Kristi Rapp, COTA. When it comes to finding items to work with that are therapeutic, budget friendly, and versatile it can sometimes be a challenge to find just the right item to use.  I have found a hidden gem with Gel Clings.  Yes, I said gel clings.  Those wiggly, stretchy, colorful clings that are often found in $1 bin and come in a variety of themes.  How are those therapeutic and what makes {Read More}

The Making of a Good Fidget

What is a fidget anyway? Fidgeting in itself is synonymous with moving and the inability to stay still. Moving the body keeps the brain awake. Have you ever been driving and you start getting a little sleepy, so you start moving in your seat, wiggling your leg, and do other movements to stay alert? Picture sitting at your desk at work and you are having trouble focusing, so you get up and take a walk so that you can continue {Read More}

5 Ways to Help Children who Have Tactile Defensiveness

This is a guest post by Kimberly Z Syers OTR/L-  BabyOT.com As a Pediatric Occupational Therapist, I work with children with tactile defensiveness on a daily basis. These children are hypersensitive to tactile (touch) stimulation and frequently find ordinary textures/touch sensations (like clothing tags, hugs or grass) to be overwhelming or even painful. These children may avoid or refuse to participate in “messy” play activities and this avoidance can impede learning and development.  Parents and caregivers are eager to help {Read More}

When Kids Chew on Pencils

Many kids have a tendency to chew on pencils, and it is not usually a problem (sometimes just gross), but when the chewing becomes extreme, it can become a problem.  In cases that become problematic, you can try to have the student replace the chewing behavior by giving them something to chew on that is more appropriate.  Some people have had success using gum, others may use a water bottle with a bite valve, and others may use a chewable {Read More}

Clean Mud

Playing in mud is a great sensory and tactile activity, but it can be very messy. This “clean mud” activity gives a similar sensation to regular mud, but you come away from the activity cleaner than when you started. You need a plastic tub or bucket with a couple of inches of water. You add a squirt of dish soap, and then start adding pieces of toilet paper. As you play in the water and toilet paper mixture, the paper {Read More}