Standards for writing and typing

There is a set of standards that have been worked out for what is expected with writing and typing per age group.  These are called the Written Production Standards for Handwriting and Keyboarding grades k-8.  They are research based, and were Sponsored by Zaner-Bloser in partnership with the American Association of School Administrators. These are being shared with permission from the creators, and all of the documentation can be found at the website for handwriting in the 21st century (hw21).  {Read More}

Spider Craft for Cutting, Folding, gluing, and Writing

Halloween is coming up soon, so I am having the kids make spiders this week.  The spider bodies require cutting out circles, and the legs require cutting rectangles.  You also have to fold the legs on the marked lines, which is a great activity for visual perception and motor planning. I put a light web on the base paper to have the kids trace over it and make their own spider web.  It would be great to follow the web {Read More}

Pom Pom Animals

When I was a kid, I spent hours making these felt and pom pom animals. I have had the pom poms in a box all these years, but could only find a couple of the hand made patterns that I used back then, so I made some new patterns. You print out the patterns on cardstock (and I laminated mine), then cut them out. You then trace around the pattern onto a scrap of colored felt (you could probably use {Read More}

Catch a Cloud and Pin it Down: Cloud Activities

I found this book called Cloudination at the AOTA conference, and it was such a simple and unique idea that would work well in some therapy situations. The book has pictures of clouds, and you draw what you see in the clouds with a dry erase marker. The book is simple, but has potential for inspiring creativity, working on visual perception, and fine motor skills with drawing. I made some extra activities that go along perfectly with the cloud book. {Read More}

Q-tip painting with templates

I have posted about Q-tip painting before, but another therapist has a different twist on it.  She has made some templates to do the q-tip painting, which requires more precision in the painting. This is a guest post by a therapist,  Tova Stulberger, who made some templates to use when Q-tip painting. Instructions: Kids dip Q-Tips into paint and press into a circle on paper- one dot per circle. This activity slows movements patterns because requires focus to dot inside {Read More}